Religion

The Roman Catholic Church has been strong
in Baltimore for nearly four hundred years. The
Maryland colony was founded as a refuge for
Catholics from the UK, so it makes sense that
the oldest cathedral in the United States is in
Baltimore.
The Archdiocese of Baltimore does not officially
acknowledge the existence of magic or
supernatural creatures beyond the Almighty,
angels, and the Prince of Darkness. If you press
them they might quietly say something about
demons but then stumble over themselves to say,
almost as if embarrassed, that most “possessions”
are nothing more than the manifestation of deep
psychological problems.
However, when mortals are in need of physical
protection from things that go bump in the
night, the one they want to talk to is Sister Peter
Ann Doran (page 377), who is one of the caretakers
at the Basilica of the Assumption. There’s a safe
house on site, a virtually impenetrable fortress
in supernatural terms. If you’re in trouble with
things beyond mortal jurisdiction, this is a good
place to be.
Of course, the Catholics don’t have a
monopoly on this sort of thing, even if they have
the best P.R. on the subject. In addition to Sister
Ann, there are at least three other good people,
representing a variety of faiths, who can help you
if you find yourself on the losing end of spiritual
warfare: Rabbi Ben Greenstone at Temple Beth
Israel, Reverend Isaiah Smith of the St. James
AME Church, and Imam Jamil al-Islam of the
Islamic Center of Baltimore. The four regularly
exchange notes on supernatural goings-on
around the city. All four of them have personal
courage way above their weight class and have
spread the word that their houses of worship are
available as refuge for people in trouble.

Religion

Bad Times in Ba'more Kriger